Whatever comes to mind

thecultofgenius:

War and Peace, Anna Karenina, The Death of Ivan Ilyich — many of us have felt the influence, to the good or the ill of our own reading and writing, of Leo Tolstoy. But whose influence did Leo Tolstoy feel the most? As luck would have it, we can give you chapter and verse on this, since the…

mochaluca:

Photos taken by Kotetsu T. Kaburagi

Art by まめ藻

best-of-memes:

Stephen fry ladies and gentlemen

plathae:

szuzanya:

hijabiswag:

in 1914, a boy chained his bike to a tree, he never returned.

nincs kérdésem

omg

plathae:

szuzanya:

hijabiswag:

in 1914, a boy chained his bike to a tree, he never returned.

nincs kérdésem

omg

kaalashnikov:

The last step is just slapping a background behind the whole thing, using Image>Adjustments>Colour Balance to tweak the hues a little (I bumped up Red, Magenta, and Blue here) then Filter>Sharpen and done.

Hopefully that was a little helpful or something, I have a few different colouring styles, I usually just paint but this is what I do when I really try to make something look nice. NORMALLY I’m so lazy I just slap everything on one layer under the lines.

I only used two brushes for this entire thing, the default photoshop Hard Round brushes and the fourth brush from the top in this set.

neurosciencestuff:

Neuroscientists study our love for deep bass sounds
Have you ever wondered why bass-range instruments tend to lay down musical rhythms, while instruments with a higher pitch often handle the melody?
According to new research from Laurel Trainor and colleagues at the McMaster Institute for Music and The Mind, this is no accident, but rather a result of the physiology of hearing.
In other words, when the bass is loud and rock solid, we have an easier time following along to the rhythm of a song.
Read more

neurosciencestuff:

Neuroscientists study our love for deep bass sounds

Have you ever wondered why bass-range instruments tend to lay down musical rhythms, while instruments with a higher pitch often handle the melody?

According to new research from Laurel Trainor and colleagues at the McMaster Institute for Music and The Mind, this is no accident, but rather a result of the physiology of hearing.

In other words, when the bass is loud and rock solid, we have an easier time following along to the rhythm of a song.

Read more